Home

Welcome to The Irene duPont Library.

The mission of the Library is to encourage academic excellence by providing service and instruction to the school community that is guided ...

 

Read more about us here.

New To The Collection
Spotlight
Featured Book
Featured Book
Featured Book

This month we are featuring the debut novel written by Tommy Orange, There, There. (The book takes its title from Gertrude Stein's line about Oakland, CA, "There is no there there.") The book takes place at the Big Oakland Powwow, a cultural festival held at the Oakland Coliseum, focusing on twelve people with deep ties to the Native American community. The Powwow is a place according to Orange, where people come to learn about their heritage. The book starts off with a prologue by Orange (more of an essay): "Our heads are on flags, jerseys, and coins. Our heads were on the penny first, of course, the Indian cent, and then on the buffalo nickel, both before we could even vote as a people - which, like the truth of what happened in history all over the world, and like all that spilled blood from slaughter, are now out of circulation."
Read More...
All Things February
February Trivia
All Things February

Another night of fun happened in the library this month. The Irene hosted a night of trivia with questions relevant to all things February. Emceed by librarian's assistant, Jenn Wilson, Jenn's questions focused on Black History Month, Lunar New Year, President's Day, and of course, Valentine's Day. Jenn was assisted by her colleague Noreen Tully, who was busy keeping score. Questions ranged from:  "What is the Greek goddess Aphrodite's Roman counterpart?" to "Who won the best actress Oscar in 2002?" (to which many students replied, "I wasn't even born in 2002!"), to "What is the zodiac animal for 2019?" and finally,  "Which president lived the longest?"

Read More...
Celebrating Black History Month
JSTOR DAILY
Celebrating Black History Month

Continuing to bring awareness to prominent stories, Black History Month provides the perfect time to reflect on the hardships the black community has had to endure. JSTOR editor Kimberly Fain's story, The Devastation of Black Wall Street, is riveting and one that is of paramount importance.

In 1921, the Greenwood district in Tulsa, Oklahoma was quite an affluent African-American community. It was a district filled with many amenities; banks, cafes, hotels, movie theaters and other businesses filled the streets.  It was an area that was thriving and a source of resentment for their white  neighbors. In May of that year, the local paper, the Tulsa Tribune ran a story stating that a black man, Dick Rowland, attempted to rape a white woman, Sarah Page. The stories vary as to what actually happened but before an investigation could get underway, race riots broke out resulting in 800 injuries, 300 deaths, and thirty-five city blocks went up in flames.

Read More...
Off Campus Access
Summer Access
Off Campus Access

For off-campus access of any subscription resource (i.e. paid-for databases), you'll be prompted to login first to OpenAthens. Your username is your "firstname.lastname" (for example john.smith); please contact us for the password, or if you have questions.

 

Databases